Kelli Kreiter
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BEATENPATH

THIS IS A DESCRIPTION

 

Beatenpath

"The simple act of taking a different route actually strengthens the connections between brain cells and builds new connections in your brain." - Rodale Wellness

 

CONTEXT

Beatenpath took form with the frustration of clicking through the google maps measurement tool on arbitrary roads to find a doable running route. While training for a marathon, you spend a lot of hours on the road and its not enough to just find a doable route, it needs to be enjoyable. Beatenpath finds a route, taking into account distance, environment, elevation, location, and more to make sure that you get out of a run the same as what you put in. 

This is a product design that focuses on user research, user interaction, and visual design for a mobile platform.


TASK

To reimagine the ways we find places to explore. The end goal is to get people outside and reengage with their environment, a simple and effective way to stimulate the brain.


RESEARCH

The research took this project a little different route (ehhh... ) than I anticipated. It turns out that the same moment happens not just before people run, but before they embark on anything active. I was able to narrow it down to 4 major activities: running, hiking, biking, and walking. The goal is to solve for this moment before the activity (where am I going?)

I was also able to narrow down a list of external factors that people take into account before they begin which included: distance, terrain, elevation, scenery, type of route, safety, location, etc. 

Each person prioritized these factors a little different, but a pattern could be found in the type of activity resulting in common priorities. For instance, when someone runs they are probably concerned with the distance and difficulty of the route, where as if someone is going for a walk, they might put more weight in the scenery and safety. 

Here is a diagram of the parameters and their priority for each activity.

Another aspect to the research was to dive into the competitive analysis. Route tracking is no new concept and there are plenty of ways that people map and explore new routes right now. I took a closer look at Google maps and .... here was the concensus. They don't carve out new routes. We active people want to stay engaged and that means fresh scenery and appropriate environments to challenge.


DEFINE

WHAT  |  An app that finds new routes based on the user's priority of external factors.

WHO |  Anyone itching to be active and in need of a new place to go. 

WHY | To get them out the door and engaging with their environment in a productive way.

Here are the design goals.

1. Active: The Active strive for lean. That means lean flows that get to the point, showing only the most relevant information at the appropriate time. 

2. Movement: This tool is all about movement, so the feel of it should be too. The design will focus on gestures and animations that are simple, engaging and smooth.

3. Environment: Spatial architecture. The user should be able to navigate the app through subtle cues and intuition, just as someone would navigate a city with no map. 

4. Human: Human over technology is the premise here. This tool is designed to get people's endorphins flowing from  


USER FLOW

A simple structure to give it the utility power and versatility. 

 
 

The simpler the architecture, the more potential for growth. ... and happy users.  

The nature of the service requires a sign in/ sign up screen, so that's where we will start. The user's goal is to get moving in a new direction with a route tailored to their needs.  Pulling from the data from our research, they will answer a few quick questions that will shape their route. Edge case: if the user is seeking other info (perhaps a previous route that is stored in their profile) then they can skip this mapping step. 

Once all of the info has been gathered, we get to the main event, the map of the route. This acts as the focal point, the launch pad, and that is the feeling that the structure should subtely evoke in the user. From here they can view their profile and adjust their settings, they can go back and change any of the parameters, they can share the run, view the details, and go. 

The goal is to go. From there the user can track their activity and rate the route once its complete. The history of it will be stored in their profile, tucked away. The way this flow is set up is to encourage the user to carve out a new route each time, not reuse the old ones. . 


 

WIREFRAME

Talk about the touch and go, available skip, and human responses. and how they relate back to the design goals.  

Talk about the spatial architecture, gestures, and how they relate back to the design goals. 


 

VISUAL DESIGN


SCREENS

Applying the visual design to the wireframes is the best part. I focused on aligning with the design goals established early on:

1. Active: The Active strive for lean. That means lean flows that get to the point, showing only the most relevant information at the appropriate time. 

2. Movement: This tool is all about movement, so the feel of it should be too. The design will focus on gestures and animations that are simple, engaging and smooth.

3. Environment: Spatial architecture. The user should be able to navigate the app through subtle cues and intuition, just as someone would navigate a city with no map. 

4. Human: Human over technology is the premise here. This tool is designed to get people's endorphins flowing from